Constitution Day

CONSTITUTION DAY 2020

September 17 is designated as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.

Below is a list of resources and exciting learning opportunities for you and your students as we celebrate this wonderful occasion!

National Archives

https://www.archives.gov/fed-employees/constitution-day.html

https://www.archives.gov/news/topics/constitution-day

National Constitution Day

https://constitutioncenter.org/learn/civic-calendar/constitution-day-civic-holiday

Constitution Center

https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/online-civic-learning-opportunities/upcoming-scholar-exchanges

Bill of Rights Institute 

https://billofrightsinstitute.arlo.co/w/seminars/51-constitution-day-live/140

Social Studies Update

Social Studies Updates

PBS Video Submission

Thank you to everyone who has submitted a video so far! If you haven’t considered contributing a video for the WVDE / WVPB partnership, please do! WVDE is seeking 8-10 minute engaging educator-created instructional content from our own WV educators. Consider creating an 8-10 minute video of yourself teaching a lesson. Lessons should be standards-based, but for a general audience. You don’t need to call a lesson out as being, for example, an 8th grade topic, but you can still teach to the 8th grade standard. The lesson can cover a topic that spans grade levels, if the content crosses multiple grades. Lessons are needed for students K-12. You can see past episodes of Education Station here.

This updated how-to video includes great tips for creating videos. When your video is complete, please upload it to OneDrive and share the video link with Dustin Lambert (dllambert@k12.wv.us) and Erika Klose (eklose@k12.wv.us). Attached you’ll find instructions for uploading files to OneDrive directly from your phone. After you share the video, please email Dustin (dllambert@k12.wv.us) the standards that align to the video content. Videos will then be vetted by WVDE before being sent on to WVPB. Thank you for joining in this endeavor to reach ALL students together.

PBS Education Station Schedule

Developed and provided by educators at the West Virginia Department of Education as well as those in the field, “Education Station” addresses the critical need to provide access to learning opportunities. It airs Tuesdays and Thursday at 9 AM on WVPB, episodes are also available on YouTube. The full schedule can be found here: https://tv.wvpublic.org/education/learn-at-home/

Census 2020

As the school year comes to an end, you may have a few opportunities to reach out to students’ parents and other members of the community.  This might be in communications about assignments or graduation events in whatever form your county is using for this unusual school year.  Please take those opportunities to remind and encourage folks to complete the 2020 Census.

As of May 22nd, the WV response rate for the 2020 Census was 47.4%. The 2020 Census will determine congressional representation, inform hundreds of billions in federal funding every year, and provide data that will impact communities for the next decade including federal funding for hospitals, fire departments, school lunch programs, and other critical programs and services.

https://2020census.gov/en/census-data.html

The Census questionnaire can be completed https://2020census.gov/en/ways-to-respond.html

Q- What if you did not receive anything in the mail. How do you respond?

A- You can still respond online to the 2020 Census even if you did not receive a letter or paper questionnaire. Go to my2020census.gov. Select the link that says, “If you do not have a Census ID, click here.” It is located below the Census ID login field. Visit Responding to the Census to learn more.

Office 365 Trainings

Mark Moore, Coordinator in the Office of Infrastructure & Network Operations, organizes and teaches several Office 365 trainings throughout the week for anyone. Please visit their website for a schedule of those trainings: https://wvde.us/infrastructure-and-network-operations/virtual-office-365-trainings/

 

CANCELED: 2020 Advanced Placement® (AP®) Summer Institutes

The West Virginia Board of Education approved the following waiver at its April 8, 2020, meeting: Policy 2510 Assuring the Quality of Education, Regulations for Education Programs, Section Appendix B: This will allow Advanced Placement® (AP®) teachers who are required to attend an AP® Summer Institute during summer 2020 as part of their three-year rotation to waive attendance until their next scheduled year of rotation. All other AP® teachers would stay in their rotation years as scheduled. Please review this document for additional guidance.

For more information please contact Karen Linville, or call the Office of Middle & Secondary Learning at 304-558-5325.

2019 WV Milken Award Recipient

Shout Out to Brian Allman!

Brian is a 6th grade social studies teacher at Buckhannon Upshur Middle School. His complete Milken Educator profile is found here.

He was also just recently named one of The State Journal’s Generation Next 40 Under 40! Read more here: https://www.wvnews.com/statejournal/special/generation_next/page-004/page_9263aff9-183b-5a4c-a9f1-d1f1077480b4.html?fbclid=IwAR1Az3hZ8tqj1Xu_TZmak7grfkxTAzuT7SL1kqHjckSHZq7AsXJOcb91V9A

 

NEW Teacher Resources

Resource Title: PBS Education Collection

Description: The videos and interactives are aligned to WV College and Career Readiness Standards. The website allows you to search their database by content and standard.

Link: https://wv.pbslearningmedia.org/search/?selected_facet=media_type:Collection

 

WVDE Hub Submissions

The West Virginia Department of Education is seeking activities, ideas, lessons and solutions from West Virginia educators that meet the needs of the current remote learning situation. We know that West Virginia educators have risen to the occasion and are demonstrating creativity, collaboration and innovative practices to engage their students.

If you have an idea to share, please visit the West Virginia Educator Hub using the link below, and then complete the form to submit your activity, idea, lesson or solution to the West Virginia Department of Education. Submissions will be reviewed each week and featured on the West Virginia Educator Hub throughout the coming months. Please share your successes in this time of remote learning with your fellow educators.

If you have any questions about the West Virginia Educator Hub for Student Engagement or the process of submitting an activity, idea, lesson or solution, please let me know.

https://wvde.us/covid19/wv-educator-hub/

Please let me know how I can help you and your students! Be well and safe! Have a great weekend.

Courtesy-

Dustin Lambert, M.Ed.

Coordinator- Middle Schools & Social Studies 6-12

WVDE Office of Middle/Secondary Learning

dllambert@k12.wv.us         wvde.state.wv.us

DBQ- Document Based Questions

DBQ- Document Based Questions

One driving force for us in social studies is to genuinely incorporate Document Based Questions (DBQ’s) into our lesson flow.  With the new evaluation system now in place when we use DBQs it will punctuate and drive learning as well as being a great tool for us to  provide evidence of the great things you are doing with your learners.  

Resources can be found at https://wvsocialstudies.com/dbq/

DBQ Resource page

Literacy in Social Studies

Literacy in Social Studies

Social Studies IS literacy.…  Since Literacy is one of the driving forces of our discipline, it reflects how our content area meshes so well ELA with this initiative.  When our last standards were introduced we began to really stress the importance of literacy in our content … we worked with the 5 Standards of Social Studies- LITERACY!  Under our new “College and Career Readiness Standards” we need to continue to emphasize Literacy in our classes, as our discipline is “counted on” to support Literacy across the curriculum.   We use primary & secondary documents as our foundation,  and our lessons can impact learning throughout the year.  Continue to emphasize reading and writing in our content area to allow our subject to be relevant and realistic to learners.   Have students involved in writing in our content to support our standards, as we “write to learn.”  As we have long known, no matter the subject, everyone is a reading teacher!   In our schools social studies teachers are encouraged to mesh what we do with the English Language Arts teachers as their new standards contain documents rooted in history.  This will be  great opportunity for us to work across the curriculum to maximize literacy with all of our students!  Here are some materials to use as a resource in advancing literacy in your classes.

Social Studies-Teaching Reading Comprehension through Social Studies Readings
History:Social Studies | Grade 6-8
History:Social Studies-Grade 9-10
History:Social Studies | Grade 11-12

https://wvsocialstudies.com/csos/

______________________________________________________________

DBQ- Document Based Questions

One driving force for us in social studies is to genuinely incorporate Document Based Questions (DBQ’s) into our lesson flow.  With the new evaluation system now in place when we use DBQs it will punctuate and drive learning as well as being a great tool for us to  provide evidence of the great things you are doing with your learners.  

Resources can be found at https://wvsocialstudies.com/dbq/

DBQ Resource page

______________________________________________________________

Thoughts On Our Discipline

Thoughts On Our Discipline

Social studies promotes engaging participatory citizenship where global awareness of civic issues such as financial literacy, healthcare, domestic affairs, foreign policy and the environment are actively monitored and influenced by all citizens interacting internationally for the benefit of all mankind.

Social studies teachers and history aficionados now have a repository of resources to enhance learning about our state, nation, governments, world and culture -and indeed life itself!  Use this site to gather tools to help others learn about our world.

Every aspect of all that is around us stems from the social sciences, and no matter what area drew you into teaching in this discipline you can use what sparked you to ignite learning in others.  Those of us in the social sciences tend to have broad interests, and it often seems to us that all other subjects stem from our content.  It is time for us to utilize the fact that we mesh so well with other disciplines to cross curricular boundaries to reach out and connect with all learners- no matter their interests.

The College and Career Readiness standards (SocStuStandards2016) allow us to “shove the dusty tomes aside” as we seize upon the use of materials that “make sense” as they are the very basis of our content.   With a bold focus on primary and secondary sources, as we facilitate learners in to discovering the “why of what humanity” we will engage students in learning from their own perspective.  Moving from the gregorian chant of “lecture-worksheet-test” will cause our classes to awake from a drowsy routine as they now will search for meaning when the task before them makes a connection.  Supply learners with the facts and evidence  and guide them to discover why our world developed as it has.

Remember that to our students in our classes “9/11” is just a page in history, as their young lives have centered around more modern newslines.  What we personally have lived thorough is just a story to them, and we need to help students see the connections that occur in the timeline of history.  We know nothing happens in isolation, but they have yet to discover that.  Making figures and events of the past relevant to the learners of today is not difficult, as the key points of the past still shape what is happening round all of us daily.  As we engage learners in these key points they will “dig up” the details that we normally would be lecturing on (and failing to reach many of them) and they will succeed as they will be learning by doing.  We test differently, as memorization has given way to being able to problem solve, and this will be enhanced as we assess for mastery.

As we look at the new standards we see that ELA and social studies have meshed readings of primary and secondary documents and it is powerful to collaborate here to lead to genuine learning.  It rests upon us all to be “reading and writing teachers” and we must convey to learners that it is within their ability to succeed.  It is paramount that we make our content relevant to launch them into genuine learning, form which many will wander in a greater depth than they would have garnered from a well worn text.  At our fingertips is a wealth of information that goes far beyond the dusty library shelves and encyclopedia volumes of yesteryear.  Do not fear engaging them in discovering truths of the social sciences that we may not have memorized ourselves.  Show  them that we are all lifetime learners and return to the wonder and passion that drew you into the social sciences.

The burden of learning rests with the learner and it is our task to guide them in genuine higher order work.  Change with the times or the times will pass you by!  Our students of today have grown up in a different world from us, and if we are to best serve them we must be willing to speak a language they understand.

George Sumner

Curriculum Specialist – Technical Integration Specialist

Fayette County Schools, West Virginia

______________________________________________________________

Literacy in Social Studies

Social Studies IS literacy.…  Since Literacy is one of the driving forces of our discipline, it reflects how our content area meshes so well ELA with this initiative.  When our last standards were introduced we began to really stress the importance of literacy in our content … we worked with the 5 Standards of Social Studies- LITERACY!  Under our new “College and Career Readiness Standards” we need to continue to emphasize Literacy in our classes, as our discipline is “counted on” to support Literacy across the curriculum.   We use primary & secondary documents as our foundation,  and our lessons can impact learning throughout the year.  Continue to emphasize reading and writing in our content area to allow our subject to be relevant and realistic to learners.   Have students involved in writing in our content to support our standards, as we “write to learn.”  As we have long known, no matter the subject, everyone is a reading teacher!   In our schools social studies teachers are encouraged to mesh what we do with the English Language Arts teachers as their new standards contain documents rooted in history.  This will be  great opportunity for us to work across the curriculum to maximize literacy with all of our students!  Here are some materials to use as a resource in advancing literacy in your classes.

Social Studies-Teaching Reading Comprehension through Social Studies Readings
History:Social Studies | Grade 6-8
History:Social Studies-Grade 9-10
History:Social Studies | Grade 11-12

https://wvsocialstudies.com/csos/

Resources From WVDE

Social Studies Update

Information/Announcements

PBS Video Submission

Thank you to everyone who has submitted a video so far! If you haven’t considered contributing a video for the WVDE / WVPB partnership, please do! WVDE is seeking 8-10 minute engaging educator-created instructional content from our own WV educators. Consider creating an 8-10 minute video of yourself teaching a lesson. Lessons should be standards-based, but for a general audience. You don’t need to call a lesson out as being, for example, an 8th grade topic, but you can still teach to the 8th grade standard. The lesson can cover a topic that spans grade levels, if the content crosses multiple grades. Lessons are needed for students K-12. You can see past episodes of Education Station here.

This updated how-to video includes great tips for creating videos. When your video is complete, please upload it to OneDrive and share the video link with Dustin Lambert (dllambert@k12.wv.us) and Erika Klose (eklose@k12.wv.us). Attached you’ll find instructions for uploading files to OneDrive directly from your phone. After you share the video, please email Dustin (dllambert@k12.wv.us) the standards that align to the video content. Videos will then be vetted by WVDE before being sent on to WVPB. Thank you for joining in this endeavor to reach ALL students together.

PBS Education Newsletter

Please find attached this week’s education newsletter from PBS. We appreciate our partnership with PBS and would like to thank Margaret Miller for being such a great resource to us and for joining in our weekly TEAMS meetings!

 

Advanced Placement Update

The full testing schedule is available at this link: Full AP® Exam Schedule

For more information please contact Karen Linville, or call the Office of Middle & Secondary Learning at 304-558-5325.

CANCELED: 2020 Advanced Placement® (AP®) Summer Institutes

The West Virginia Board of Education approved the following waiver at its April 8, 2020, meeting: Policy 2510 Assuring the Quality of Education, Regulations for Education Programs, Section Appendix B: This will allow Advanced Placement® (AP®) teachers who are required to attend an AP® Summer Institute during summer 2020 as part of their three-year rotation to waive attendance until their next scheduled year of rotation. All other AP® teachers would stay in their rotation years as scheduled. Please review this document for additional guidance.

For more information please contact Karen Linville, or call the Office of Middle & Secondary Learning at 304-558-5325.

 

NEW Teacher Resources

Resource Title: West Virginia History in 2 Minutes Or Less

Description: Brian Casto, WV Studies teacher at Milton Middle School, has created 17 videos about WV for use in the classroom. He continues to upload videos. Please check out his YouTube channel to access his videos. In addition, Mr. Casto has been gracious to share the secret behind the creation of his work. He uses an app called Clips. Here is the link: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/clips/id1212699939

Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyNmi_6XxgesFZXHAkGFtpw/videos

 

WVDE Hub Submissions

The West Virginia Department of Education is seeking activities, ideas, lessons and solutions from West Virginia educators that meet the needs of the current remote learning situation. We know that West Virginia educators have risen to the occasion and are demonstrating creativity, collaboration and innovative practices to engage their students.

If you have an idea to share, please visit the West Virginia Educator Hub using the link below, and then complete the form to submit your activity, idea, lesson or solution to the West Virginia Department of Education. Submissions will be reviewed each week and featured on the West Virginia Educator Hub throughout the coming months. Please share your successes in this time of remote learning with your fellow educators.

 

If you have any questions about the West Virginia Educator Hub for Student Engagement or the process of submitting an activity, idea, lesson or solution, please let me know.

https://wvde.us/covid19/wv-educator-hub/

 

WVDE Resources

Please check out our resource page for a collection of lesson ideas and virtual experiences for students. https://wvde.us/covid19/resources/

 

Professional Learning

National Constitution Center

Mondays from 12 –12:20 p.m. EDT for open-source professional development programs highlighting the Center’s free, online resources and strategies to support constitutional literacy education in the classroom or remotely. Online professional development programs are facilitated by a member of the Center’s education team and hosted on Zoom. Each week features different resources reflecting the topic of that week’s Scholar Exchanges.

Upcoming webinars include:

  • April 27: The Second Amendment: Past and Present
  • May 4: Constitutional Rights: Origins and Travels

 

Register for any of these dates here.

 

Teaching American History

Title: Documents in Detail
Web-Link: https://teachingamericanhistory.org/programs/webinars/documents-in-detail/
Host:
Teaching American History
Time/Date:
April 22, 2020 and May 13, 2020; 7 PM
Audience:
Teachers of American History
Description:
Documents in Detail is TAH.org’s second webinar series, offering a close read and in-depth discussion of a single document in each episode. Scholars will discuss the ideas, historical context, purpose, speaker, audience, and use of language in each document, in order to help teachers gain a deeper understanding of one core document from American History. Requires free registration

 

Teaching Tolerance

Title: Teaching Tolerance
Web-Link:
https://www.tolerance.org/professional-development/webinars
Host:
Teaching Tolerance
Time/Date:
on-demand
Audience:
all teachers
Description:
Teaching Tolerance webinars offer helpful guidance and great ideas from our experienced teaching and learning specialists and from innovative educators in the Teaching Tolerance community. Watch these FREE on-demand webinars at your own pace and share them with colleagues!

 

National Archives

Title: Teaching the Big Picture: Incorporating Photographs into Lesson Plans about Native Communities

Web-Link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeekezzFHcj1YC7N6r 1a7dGRzPXvhl5h1Ldr37ejJScNS8OdA/viewform
Host:
National Archives
Time/Date:
May 6, 2020; 7 PM
Audience:
high school social studies educators
Description:
Discover how to incorporate photographs from the National Archives into your lessons about American Indian communities. Participants will explore how to locate photographs in NARA holdings, the process of analyzing and interpreting primary source documents, and ways to contextualize the history depicted in the images.

This webinar is part of our Native American professional development series. Each program features new resources for locating and using Federal records related to American Indians and Alaska Natives. Requires free registration

 

Courtesy:

Dustin Lambert, M.Ed.

wvde.state.wv.us

Timely Resources

Digital Websites providing a foundation for in-depth lessons:

The resources and materials provided below are for all students. Collaboration with the special educators who serve children with disabilities at your school is encouraged to maximize the support and guidance that individual children receive.

Teacher Resources

Resource Description Teacher Account Required? Printable Limitations to Free Access?
icivic.org iCivics works to ensure every student in America receives a quality and engaging civic education and graduates from high school well prepared and enthusiastic for citizenship. Once you create an account, full access is completely free. The website includes engaging games, lessons, and printable handouts on a wide-range of civic topics. Yes, to download lesson materials Yes No
Everfi Financial literacy website that empowers students to effectively set goals, prepare for careers, and manage their financial future through interactive, real-life scenarios. Access requires teachers to set up a free account and add students who also require a free account. Yes No No
Next Gen Personal Finance Financial literacy website No, but to assign certain material to students and monitor progress an account is required Yes No
National Archives Teach with documents using online tools. Locate teachable primary sources. Find new and favorite lessons and create your own activities for your students. Check out their resource document for other free resources. No Yes No
Digital History  Technology resource for teachers and students No No No

Free Virtual Tours

Diverse Engagement Links

Black History Info to be used all year long

Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Mooreland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) to study the achievements of black Americans and people of African descent. The organization promoted black history in schools and called for the celebration of African history throughout the U.S. President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976. Since that time, every American president has designated February as Black History Month.  Black history is rich, and can be taught year round.  Explore the links below as resources.

As we recall those of eminent significance, let us recognize the men and women of diversity who contributed so greatly to our country. Did you know the ironing board design was improved through a patent granted to an African American woman by the name of Sarah Boone? Did you know refrigerated freight trucks were invented by African American inventor Frederick McKinley Jones?  These two examples and a multitude of others may help to educate our students on the positive impact of black history and the role we all play in preserving the rights and privileges of each citizen in our blended American culture.

Here are just a few resources to help: 

 A collection of information from various organizations

Public Broadcasting Service

 

No-Tech/Low Tech Learning Activities

  • Interviews – Have students interview a grandparent with specific questions about significant events and people they experienced from history.
  • Timeline – Create a timeline of a current event using newspapers and news outlets on TV.
  • Scavenger Hunt – Engage in a scavenger hunt around the house. Each item on the scavenger hunt may require children to tell the story of its history. For example: grandma’s quilt – interview an adult in the home who knows all about this piece of history.
  • Census Importance – Call 10 adults in your family and explain the importance of completing the Census on April 1st. The information packet from the U.S. Census Bureau will appear in your mail with all the instructions.
  • Community Service – Plan a community service project as a family.
  • “Made In” – Create a list of 50 items in your house and write down where the item was made.
  • Elections – Create a list of all the individuals running for office from a newspaper, on TV, or from campaign signs along the road. Locate their contact information and call one or two with questions and concerns
  • Expenses – Create a list of every expense of your household for 7 days.
  • Pay Stub – Explain your most recent pay stub to your middle or high school child.
  • Budget – Create a budget with your family.
  • Income Tax – Walk your high school child through the income tax process. Discuss your W2, federal and state filing, and certain tax credits your family applied for this year to obtain a return.
  • Credit Cards – Talk to your child about credit cards. Show them your statement and talk about interest. Discuss how a credit card can improve or harm one’s credit score. Explain to them the importance of maintain good credit.
  • Personal Finance – Introduce your child to checking, savings, and the use of debit cards.
  • Census – Complete the Census with your child on April 1st.
  • Checkbooks – Balance your checkbook with your child present.
  • Documentary – Watch the documentary Food, Inc. (free on Hulu). Write down 20 things you learned from viewing this film

 

Thanks- Dustin Lambert, M.Ed. – Coordinator Middle Schools & Social Studies 6-12 –                            WVDE Office of Middle/Secondary Learning

Black History Month Resources

Black History Month

February 2020

 

Black History Month began in 1915 a half a century after the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Mooreland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) to study the achievements of black Americans and people of African descent. The organization promoted black history in schools and called for the celebration of African history throughout the U.S. President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976. Since that time, every American president has designated February as Black History Month.

 

We cherish this opportunity to emphasize the contributions of each culture and person represented in our rich history as a nation. We all have a story to tell and the legacy we leave in our own communities will write our history for generations to follow.

 

As we recall those of eminent significance, let us recognize the men and women of diversity who contributed so greatly to our country. Did you know the ironing board design was improved through a patent granted to an African American woman by the name of Sarah Boone? Did you know refrigerated freight trucks were invented by African American inventor Frederick McKinley Jones?

 

These two examples and a multitude of others may help to educate our students on the positive impact of black history and the role we all play in preserving the rights and privileges of each citizen in our blended American culture.

 

Here are just a few resources to help you celebrate Black History Month in your classroom throughout the month.

  

A collection of information from various organizations

https://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/for-teachers/

 

https://www.history.com/news/9-black-inventors-african-american

 

http://www.nea.org/tools/lessons/bhm-curriculum-resources-gradesK-5.html

 

 

Public Broadcasting Service

https://www.pbs.org/black-culture/educational-resources/

 

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/tag/black-history-month/page/3/

Countering Hate With Education

Countering Hate With Education

Auschwitz flyer

Education transforms lives. The International March of The Living provides leadership in Holocaust education, strengthens education systems worldwide, and responds to contemporary global challenges through education. A major theme is human rights. We believe education is a tool to prevent violent extremism. We are witnessing a rise in anti-Semitic attacks worldwide. In response, we are scheduling an international live streamed broadcast from Auschwitz sponsored by The Miller Center for Community Protection and Resilience at Rutgers University, on April 20th at 5 PM Poland time.

Effectively communicating the messages of the Holocaust becomes increasingly challenging with time. The passing of survivors and the increase in anti-Semitism make this all the more important.

Please reference the link below and the attached flyer for more information.

https://motl.org/from-the-gates-of-auschwitz-countering-hate-through-education/

 

The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author or organization represented and do not necessarily reflect the views of the WVDE, or its employees.

 

Best Regards,

Dustin Lambert, M.Ed.

Coordinator

Middle Schools & Social Studies 6-12

WVDE Office of Middle/Secondary Learning

Building 6, Room 221

1900 Kanawha Boulevard, East

Charleston, WV 25305-0330

304.558.5325 P

304.558.1834 F

dllambert@k12.wv.us

wvde.state.wv.us